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George Washington

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Years later, Washington's experience, military bearing, and leadership skills made him an obvious choice for Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution, recommended by his future-vice-president and presidential successor John Adams.
 
Years later, Washington's experience, military bearing, and leadership skills made him an obvious choice for Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution, recommended by his future-vice-president and presidential successor John Adams.
   
There were several events that led to the American Revolution, and the Colonial militias armed themselves for several years; however the first major battle was Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775. The night before; British General and Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Gage ordered his troops to raid the Continental Headquarters within Concord, Massachusetts: primarily to attempt to arrest Continental leaders John Handcock and Samuel Adams. Continental Patriot Robert Newman alerted Paul Revere, William Dawes and Samuel Prescott about the approaching British army. This 'Midnight Ride' mobilized the Massachusetts Continental Militia (led by Captain John Parker) at Lexington to intercept them. British Major John Pitcairn's forces met Parker's forces in Lexington. Both officers ordered their troops to hold fire, and Parker even agreed to allow Pitcairn to continue his march to Concord; yet an unidentified soldier fired his gun, sparking the battle (this event was dubbed "The Shot Heard 'Round the World"). The Battle of Lexington specifically ended quickly; as the Lexington militia lacked the numbers and discipline to stand against the Redcoats' bayonet charge. The Continental Forces initially routed, but fell back to the North Bridge in Concord to regroup with the other militias. The Redcoats began their raid of the militia's supplies and attempted to burn the rebel weapons; but this fire outraged the North Bridge militia as they thought the entire town was being torched. The Continentals were still outnumbered despite their reinforcements, and so decided to hold their line on the North Bridge to prevent the British forces from outflanking them. The North Bridge militia outnumbered the Redcoat unit that engaged with them, and so the British began to regroup and evacuate. The majority of the casualties actually occurred during this retreat; with the militias sniping from the roads. The Continental Army won that battle and the war officially began.
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There were several events that led to the American Revolution, and the Colonial militias armed themselves for several years; however the first major battle was Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775. The night before; British General and Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Gage ordered his troops to raid the Continental Headquarters within Concord, Massachusetts: primarily to attempt to arrest Continental leaders John Handcock and Samuel Adams. Continental Patriot Robert Newman alerted Paul Revere, William Dawes and Samuel Prescott about the approaching British army. This 'Midnight Ride' mobilized the Massachusetts Continental Militia (led by Captain John Parker) at Lexington to intercept them. British Major John Pitcairn's forces met Parker's forces in Lexington. Both officers ordered their troops to hold fire, and Parker even agreed to allow Pitcairn to continue his march to Concord; yet an unidentified soldier fired his gun, sparking the battle (this event was dubbed "The Shot Heard 'Round the World"). The Battle of Lexington specifically ended quickly; as the Lexington militia lacked the numbers and discipline to stand against the Redcoats' bayonet charge. The Continental Forces initially routed, but fell back to the North Bridge in Concord to regroup with the other militias. The Redcoats began their raid of the militia's supplies and attempted to burn the rebel weapons; but this fire outraged the North Bridge militia as they thought the entire town was being torched. The Continentals were still outnumbered despite their reinforcements, and so decided to hold their line on the North Bridge to prevent the British forces from outflanking them. The Continental Army won that battle and the war officially began.
   
 
Washington forced the British out of Boston in 1776, but was defeated and nearly captured later that year when the British captured New York City. Washington fled to the countryside with his main fort in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. That winter was harsh for the Continental Army, as famine and frostbite threatened the army: 2000 out of the 12000 troops stationed at Valley Forge died that winter. Early on Christmas morning in 1776, Washington's forces left the fort, crossed the Delaware River and won two key battles at Trenton and Princeton, retaking New Jersey and restoring momentum to the Patriot cause.
 
Washington forced the British out of Boston in 1776, but was defeated and nearly captured later that year when the British captured New York City. Washington fled to the countryside with his main fort in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. That winter was harsh for the Continental Army, as famine and frostbite threatened the army: 2000 out of the 12000 troops stationed at Valley Forge died that winter. Early on Christmas morning in 1776, Washington's forces left the fort, crossed the Delaware River and won two key battles at Trenton and Princeton, retaking New Jersey and restoring momentum to the Patriot cause.
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